My first foray into a real programming language: Javascript.

Back in September, I decided to learn HTML and CSS through Codecademy. I created a project to apply this learning. The result was my profile website, DanielleWerner.com. (While it is up there for the world to see, it’s not finished, and I have plans for it yet.)

But then Codecademy wanted me to mix JavaScript with HTML/CSS, and I had to stop, as it assumed some knowledge of JavaScript already. That’s because Codecademy starts off naturally by teaching you JavaScript. However, I bypassed their default pathway and went straight to HTML/CSS, as that’s what I needed to do what I wanted to do. I finished what HTML/CSS stages I could, but now I’m going back to the start and learning JavaScript.

My initial thoughts using ‘prompt’ and ‘.length’ were that this was really cool and not too difficult. Then I started going into functions and if/else loops, where I still am now. It has suddenly dawned on me that learning JavaScript won’t be like learning HTML. They’re two very separate styles of languages. You can do a lot with just a little HTML (like heading and paragraph tags), but JavaScript is a lot more difficult to apply. It’s a lot more involved and a lot less forgiving. I’m being challenged to break down something I can do simply, like calculating the power of a number (e.g. 2 cubed), into chunks for the computer to process. HTML gives you a framework but let’s you use your language within it; JavaScript is much for like a whole new language, with its own vocabulary, grammar and punctuation.

But I will prevail.

It’ll help once I learn enough to start applying some of the ideas to my website. I so want to learn how to make interactive pages, to be able to get the internet to do my bidding. And it’s a stepping stone to where I want to go.

Another project I’m considering is making a basic web app, which would involve learning about LAMP: Linux, Apache HTTP server, MySQL and a programming language like PHP. Why? Because I have ideas for basic apps and I want to try them out. Also, everyone seems to want some SQL experience in the tech world, and I’ve heard that it’s difficult to learn when you don’t have a project to apply it to.

I can finally share one of my current projects!

Ok, if you read my previous post and clicked on a certain link, you would have discovered my real name. So hi! I’m Danielle.

The biggest reason for the reveal was so that I could share my knitting for charity fundraising page with you. However, I have another project I want to share with you… I’m learning HTML and CSS, using them to create a resume website for myself! I feel the skills I’m currently learning from this project are helpful today, what with so much of our lives online. I plan on going further with this and learning other languages, such as Javascript and something like Python, eventually leading to learning how to code iOS and Android apps.

So, without further ado, my work-in-progress website is……

DanielleWerner.com

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My resource database: a work in progress.

Months ago, Flan introduced me to a site called Drupal Gardens. It’s basically a webhosting site for people with more skills than I have in site management, but we still created a free site for me to play around with. I’ve called it OTresources, and it will be a database of all the articles I’ve read with short summaries. Of course, it’s lacking all the articles I’ve read before now, besides one that I put in when we first created the site.

Nevertheless, if you’re interested, check it out. There’s nothing there really, at the moment, and I still need to figure out how everything works.