End, Middle, Beginning.

End.

I had my final exam on Thursday. If you recall, I had ten days to prepare four case studies, and two case studies would be in the exam. The case studies were mild/moderate learning disabilities, rheumatoid arthritis, schizophrenia and traumatic brain injury. I was hoping to get the LD and TBI case studies, but alas, neither were on the exam. I’m sure I passed, but I would have felt more confident answering the questions if I could relate to my experience working with brain injuries. Having never worked with someone with a learning disability, I don’t know why I wanted that case study, but then I’ve never encountered RA, nor have I really worked with someone with schizophrenia.

Middle.

The next few days involved trying to reestablish occupational balance. I started reading for pleasure again. I decided to try catching up with some of my TV shows. I played a strategy computer game with Flan and my brother to exercise my brain in a different way. My face is already starting to look clearer from the drop in my stress levels.

Then today I started working – temporarily – at a school in Newbury. I loved it! It’s too bad that I have to drive all the way there and back, and that it’s temporary.

Beginning.

I have to really start looking for an OT job and figuring out the magic formula to get to the interview stage. I think I’ve found one just inside the M25 down the M40, so I could commute (yeah, I hate driving, but I love Oxford). It’s a paediatric centre, and they need a Band 5. I think I have a better chance getting an interview for this one than I have most jobs on offer, as I have absolutely no acute experience, nor orthopaedic, nor stroke, nor community. On the other hand, I did my dissertation on using video games with children with cerebral palsy, I had an adolescent mental placement, I had my final placement in a school for children with dyspraxia and I am now working in another school. I think paediatrics is the way to go! Plus, I might get to venture a bit into assistive technology, hopefully!

Stung by a bee.

Today I was stung by a bee. It happened just before I was about to sit down to work, and it shattered my hopes of being super productive.

How it happened: I was wearing wide-legged jeans. I think that, while I was downstairs making myself lunch, a bee wandered in through the conservatory door. It must have been curious and continued its explorations up my one leg, stopping only when it got caught around my thigh. It panicked. It stung me. I wasn’t expecting a sharp stinging sensation in my leg, and I rubbed at it. Mistake, I know. I was crying and screaming for my mother. IT HURT. Somewhere in my own pain-filled haze, I noticed a bee hobbling away from the scene of the crime. I was to preoccupied with the agony to focus on it. It was going to die anyway.

The effect: I couldn’t work. I can’t¬†work. The stinging sensation hasn’t died down now, and it’s SHARP. There’s also a deep, dull throbbing underneath the skin, probably thanks to my mom’s advice of ‘squeezing the poison out’. After checking the NHS Choices website, I learned that you don’t want to do anything to the area besides wash it and put ice on it. I had a bag of frozen peas on it until the poor peas defrosted. I also learned that the pain could last for up to 48 hours. Great. This does not work for me, as I have to go to placement tomorrow. If I’m still all tensed up and in pain when I have to hobble the twenty minutes from the train station to the school, the day will not go well. I can’t think straight! I can’t walk properly either. All I can feel is the tension in my neck and the throbbing and stinging in my right thigh.

Anyone have a miracle cure? PLEASE?